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Taxation Board game for Christmas

Taxation magazine has produced a Taxation Board game to help bored accountants and tax advisers involve their families in their technical world over the festive season. Or maybe it's something to play in the office before you leave for Christmas.

As Richard Curtis who devised the game says, rather optimistically:

Who knows, this could be the first of a great Christmas tradition - the annual Taxation board game. Watch out for 'Taxopoly', 'Trivial Pursuit - the Tax Edition' and 'Taxudo' (the Inspector, in the office with Tolley's Orange Tax Handbook 2008-09).
To play the game just follow the guidance provided on the Taxation website:
First, snaffle the dice from that old Monopoly set under the stairs.
Next you need some playing pieces: we have provided some cut outs of famous tax faces at the foot of the game for you to use. They're downloadable along with the playing board. Download them by clicking the PDF link at the foot of this article.
You can choose (no fighting now) which of this year’s tax personalities you would like to be: Alistair Darling (Chancellor of the Exchequer), George Osborne (Shadow Chancellor), Vince Cable (the Liberal Democrats’ economic spokesperson), Dave Hartnett (HMRC’s Permanent Secretary for Tax), David Taxable (Tax Personality 2008) or Rufus (The Dog).
Alternatively, there’s always the boot from that Monopoly set.
If you really have a burning desire to be, say, Stephen Timms, Angela Eagle or Kitty Ussher – or even (for the sake of auld lang syne?) Dawn Primarolo, then you will have to track down some photos and using sticky-back tape make your own piece.
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